October 25th, 2011

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Tuesday

I went to the eye doctor, and my eyes are pretty healthy.  I have the usual nearsightedness that I've had for as long as I can remember, but nothing new.  It hadn't gotten that much worse since last time.  The eye doctor and optician both said that my current prescription would still work pretty well for me.

I got Rick Reed's Caregiver from Rainbow eBooks.  They had their Totally Tuesday new release discount.  They seem to get books from some publishers very quickly.  I don't know what the usual timeframe is, but for some it seems within weeks.
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what turned into a rant on labels

I had added several paragraphs to Monday's entry, then lost it all when I tried to save it.  I reconstructed some, and am now attempting to reconstruct the rest.

I was thinking of how much Uly loved Family Unit, so much so that he thought it should be made into a movie.  Then I thought about how several AE members who post on the m/m romance forum were really jazzed about The Salisbury Key, and that's where the rant started.

I liked The Salisbury Key when it seemed like it was a contemporary, but then it got really woo-woo out there with conspiracies, the science, and archeological things towards the end.  It just got all too much for me.  I like what looks like a contemporary to stay a contemporary, and not turn into a big suspense-thriller with things going on that could have world-changing effects.  If I wanted possibly world-changing happenings and far-ranging conspiracies in a book, I would read those suspense-thrillers.  So that's where I think the labeling on that one was wrong for me, and the reviews I saw didn't go into how out there it all got at the end.  I'm fine with alternate universe if I know it's alternate universe.  I just need to know that.

(Added: I looked it up, and the tag line for The Salisbury Key is: "Can love repair a shattered life in time to save the world?"  So there is a bit about saving the world.  And I do blow past tag lines that are rhetorical questions.  It's dumb because you know the answer is yes if it's a question about a romance working out when the book is in the romance genre.  I didn't parse out the tag line, it's true.)

It's not just one author.  There have been a few others I've been upset with when it was a contemporary, and then suddenly the antagonists tried to kill one or both of the heroes.  One of those was labeled a romantic comedy.  Trying to kill someone takes it out of romantic comedy, in my opinion.  If I expect there will be violence in a book, I'm generally okay with it.  For instance, in Fighting in France, in the Big War series, I pretty much took the trench warfare and charges over the top in stride.  I knew there would be a lot of death, and that conditions were horrible.  I was prepared for reading it.  Yes, it was fiction, but based on real-life events.

I want my light and fluffy romances to stay light and fluffy, and I expect a contemporary romance to stay modest in scope.  Not that things can't happen, just not world-changing suspense-thriller things, or sudden veers into the paranormal, or villains going from mild villainy to trying to kill the protagonists.  It's about the labeling and what to expect.






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and something I noticed

Cheating Chance is the free book this week at MLR Press.  (http://www.mlrbooks.com/books.php)  I am pimping it out to those of my friends who read m/m romance, posting, e-mailing them about it, and so on.  I love Nicky, though I had my moments of thinking Brandon was a jerk.  I certainly cared about what was going on with the characters.  I got the Torquere Toy Box anthologies that had Taking the Odds stories in them.  Cheating Chance was one of the earlier m/m romances I read that was in e-book format.  I had gotten some books as trade paperbacks before that.  It's stood up very well now that I've read hundreds and hundreds more m/m romances.  It's still up there among my favorites, and is one of the not-that-many m/m books I got in print after I learned about e-books.  Well, there were even fewer that I wanted in print also after I already had the e-book.  It works out to about two bookshelves on a small bookcase.  Anyway, I'm taking the chance to give it high recommendations among "my people."  I've mentioned it before to all of them, I'm pretty sure.